Department of Labor and Regulation

Title - Labor Market Information Center

South Dakota Nonfarm Worker Trends in 2012

From the March 2013 South Dakota e-Labor Bulletin

Please note: Unless otherwise noted, the following highlights are based on a comparison of annual average data for 2011 and 2012.

South Dakota total nonfarm employment increased by 6,500 workers (1.6 percent) from 2011 to 2012. Our state fared relatively well during the recession and into the recovery stage, which was reflected by our unemployment rate being consistently much lower than the national rate.

Goods producing industries (which include mining, logging and construction plus manufacturing) in South Dakota had a gain of 2,100 workers (3.4 percent) during 2012. Service providing industries (which includes all other sectors except government) had a gain of 4,500 workers (1.3 percent).

South Dakota Statewide
Nonfarm Wage & Salaried Workers by Industry
Industry
2011 Annual Average 2012
Annual Average
Absolute Change Percent Change
Total Nonfarm 407,500 414,000 6,500 1.6%
  Total Private 329,500 336,500 7,000 2.1%
  Goods Producing 60,200 62,300 2,100 3.4%
  Service Providing 347,300 351,800 4,500 1.3%
Mining, Logging & Construction 21,100 21,000 -100 -0.5%
Manufacturing 39,200 41,300 2,100 5.1%
Wholesale Trade 19,000 19,500 500 2.6%
Retail Trade 50,200 51,000 800 1.6%
Transportation, Warehousing & Utilities 12,600 12,500 -100 -0.8%
Information 6,400 6,200 -200 -3.2%
Financial Activities 28,100 28,700 600 2.1%
Professional & Business Services 28,700 29,000 300 1.0%
Educational & Health Services 65,300 67,200 1,900 2.8%
Leisure & Hospitality 43,400 44,300 900 2.0%
Other Services (except Public Administration) 15,600 15,800 200 1.3%
Government 78,000 77,500 -500 -0.6%
Note: Numbers may not add due to rounding.
Source: Labor Market Information Center, SD Department of Labor and Regulation, February 2013.

The mining, logging and construction sector remained relatively stable over the year, with a 100 worker (0.5 percent) loss. The construction industry accounts for most of the workers within this sector. Data published by the U.S. Census Bureau shows new privately owned housing permits in South Dakota had a large increase this past year, from 2,939 permits in 2011 to 4,431 in 2012. This compares to an overall decline of 590 (16.7 percent) permits for the 2009-2011 period.

Manufacturing gained 2,100 workers (5.1 percent) from 2011 to 2012. This gain continues to reflect a comeback from the recessionary losses that occurred during the years 2008 and 2009. The manufacturing sector has experienced over-the-year employment gains since July 2010.

The wholesale trade sector increased by 500 workers (2.6 percent) during the year. The strong agriculture economy in South Dakota served as a solid source of support to the wholesale trade industry.

The retail trade sector gained 800 workers (1.6 percent) from 2011 to 2012. This sector continues to show steady growth since the recession.

Transportation, warehousing and utilities remained relatively stable over the year, with a minimal loss of 100 workers (0.8 percent). The information sector also remained relatively stable, with a loss of 200 workers (3.2 percent).

Worker levels in the financial activities industry increased by 600 workers (2.1 percent). This sector is showing growth compared to a decrease in 2011 related to the effects of the restrictive legislation that impacted credit card laws.

The professional and business services added 300 workers (1.0 percent). The professional and business service industry increase was the result of other industry businesses increasing output, and therefore needing a higher level of services being provided by professional and business services.

The education and health services sector increased by 1,900 workers (2.8 percent). Most of this growth is related to expansion in the healthcare and social assistance sector, which added 1,600 workers, continuing a lengthy growth trend. State healthcare worker numbers have increased every year since the data was first recorded in 1972. The continued worker demand in this industry is related to several factors, including continued population growth, an aging population and specialized procedures which require additional staff. As life expectancy increases related to medical advancements, people are living longer, with the older population typically using health care services more often.

Leisure and hospitality increased by 900 workers (2.0 percent). Other services remained relatively stable with a gain of 200 workers (1.3 percent) from 2011 to 2012.

Total government reflected a loss of 500 workers (0.6 percent). This loss was shared by the federal government (100 workers) and local government (500 workers). The state government worker level remained stable, increasing by 100 workers.

Rapid City Metropolitan Statistical Area (RCMSA) Nonfarm Worker Trends

The Rapid City MSA's total nonfarm worker level increased 400 (0.6 percent) from 2011 to 2012. Most industry sectors showed growth over the year or remained stable, with the exception of the mining, logging and construction sector (loss of 100 workers or 2.3 percent), retail trade (loss of 100 workers or 1.1 percent) and transportation, warehousing and utilities (loss of 100 workers or 6.3 percent).

Rapid City Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA)
Nonfarm Wage & Salaried Workers by Industry
Industry
2011
Annual Average
2012
Annual Average
Absolute Change Percent Change
Total Nonfarm 61,700 62,100 400 0.6%
  Total Private 50,900 51,600 700 1.4%
  Goods Producing 7,000 7,000 0 0.0%
  Service Providing 54,700 55,100 400 0.7%
Mining, Logging & Construction 4,500 4,400 -100 -2.3%
Manufacturing 2,500 2,600 100 3.8%
Wholesale Trade 2,100 2,100 0 0.0%
Retail Trade 9,000 8,900 -100 -1.1%
Transportation, Warehousing & Utilities 1,700 1,600 -100 -6.3%
Information 900 900 0 0.0%
Financial Activities 3,800 3,800 0 0.0%
Professional & Business Services 4,900 5,000 100 2.0%
Educational & Health Services 10,100 10,400 300 2.9%
Leisure & Hospitality 8,700 9,100 400 4.4%
Other Services (except Public Administration) 2,800 2,900 100 3.4%
Government 10,800 10,500 -300 -2.9%
Note: Numbers may not add due to rounding.
Source: Labor Market Information Center, SD Department of Labor and Regulation, February 2013.

Sioux Falls Metropolitan Statistical Area (SFMSA) Nonfarm Worker Trends

The Sioux Falls MSA total nonfarm worker level increased by 3,700 workers (2.6 percent) from 2011 to 2012. Most industry sectors added workers or remained stable, with the exception of the information, which showed a drop of 200 workers (7.4 percent).

Sioux Falls Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA)
Nonfarm Wage & Salaried Workers by Industry
Industry
2011
Annual Average
2012
Annual Average
Absolute Change Percent Change
Total Nonfarm 136,100 139,800 3,700 2.6%
  Total Private 123,300 126,900 3,600 2.8%
  Goods Producing 19,000 19,700 700 3.6%
  Service Providing 117,100 120,200 3,100 2.6%
Mining, Logging & Construction 6,500 6,700 200 3.0%
Manufacturing 12,500 13,000 500 3.8%
Wholesale Trade 7,100 7,300 200 2.7%
Retail Trade 17,000 17,400 400 2.3%
Transportation, Warehousing & Utilities 4,900 4,900 0 0.0%
Information 2,900 2,700 -200 -7.4%
Financial Activities 15,200 15,800 600 3.8%
Professional & Business Services 12,200 12,800 600 4.7%
Educational & Health Services 27,300 28,500 1,200 4.2%
Leisure & Hospitality 13,000 13,100 100 0.8%
Other Services (except Public Administration) 4,700 4,700 0 0.0%
Government 12,800 13,000 200 1.5%
Note: Numbers may not add due to rounding.
Source: Labor Market Information Center, SD Department of Labor and Regulation, February 2013.

Balance of State Nonfarm Worker Trends

The balance of state is comprised of all counties not defined as part of an MSA. Therefore, balance of state includes all counties except Pennington, Meade, Lincoln, Minnehaha, McCook and Turner. The remainder of state data allows one to see how industries are doing in the more rural areas of South Dakota.

Total nonfarm employment in this area increased by 2,400 workers (1.1 percent). The industries reflecting worker losses include professional and business services (400 workers or 3.6 percent) and mining, logging and construction (200 workers or 2.0 percent). Manufacturing added the most workers (1,500 or 5.8 percent).

South Dakota Balance of State Area
Nonfarm Wage & Salaried Workers by Industry
Industry
2011
Annual Average
2012
Annual Average
Absolute Change Percent Change
Total Nonfarm 209,700 212,100 2,400 1.1%
  Total Private 155,300 158,000 2,700 1.7%
  Goods Producing 34,200 35,600 1,400 3.9%
  Service Providing 175,500 176,500 1,000 0.6%
Mining, Logging & Construction 10,100 9,900 -200 -2.0%
Manufacturing 24,200 25,700 1,500 5.8%
Wholesale Trade 9,800 10,100 300 3.0%
Retail Trade 24,200 24,700 500 2.0%
Transportation, Warehousing & Utilities 6,000 6,000 0 0.0%
Information 2,600 2,600 0 0.0%
Financial Activities 9,100 9,100 0 0.0%
Professional & Business Services 11,600 11,200 -400 -3.6%
Educational & Health Services 27,900 28,300 400 1.4%
Leisure & Hospitality 21,700 22,100 400 1.8%
Other Services (except Public Administration) 8,100 8,200 100 1.2%
Government 54,400 54,000 -400 -0.7%
Note: Numbers may not add due to rounding.
Source: Labor Market Information Center, SD Department of Labor and Regulation, February 2013.

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Marcia Hultman, Secretary
700 Governors Drive
Pierre, SD 57501-2291
Tel. 605.773.3101
Fax. 605.773.6184